Academics

Summer Assignments 2023

Happy Summer, Prep Readers! It's time for some SSR--Sustained Summer Reading. Whether for pleasure or leisure, reading reinforces our Ignatian mission by promoting the ideals of a lifelong learner who is “open to growth” and “academically ambitious.” Summer reading also cultivates a community of learners by having a large and diverse group with disparate experiences and ideas share the same text. What learning comes from shared experience, and insightful, reflective conversation about that experience!

The History and English Departments have issued required summer reading for you. The departments have assigned a book per grade level. Go to each department’s summer reading tab to learn the specifics of each department’s requirements.

Also note that each department encourages you to “read beyond” the required readings. It is through reading that we learn more about ourselves and the human condition, often through characters whose journeys seem so different from ours. As you know, often it’s through embarking on a character’s intrepid, serpentine, magical, painful and self-fulfilling quest that we find common ground, a shared humanity. So, seek to discover more about yourself and the world around you through your reading this summer. In this quest for the magis, you are bound to have a great summer full of great books.

Also, the Math Department requires summer packets to be completed based on your 2023-24 course.

Be in touch with us if you have any questions.

AMDG,

Mr. Dave Fortin, History Department Chair
Mr. Andrew Fabry, Math Department Chair
Ms. Sheri San Chirico, Religious Studies Chair
Mr. Andrew Whelan, English Department Chair

English Assignments

All students must read and annotate the appropriate book for their course. You can find a link to the English Department's Annotation Guide below. If you have any questions, please contact the English Department Chair Andrew Whelan at awhelan@vocationtravel.com.

Freshmen:
Students enrolled in Honors English I, you must read and annotate Seasons of Life, by Jeffrey Marx. 

Juniors:
For juniors accepted into AP English III, you must read and annotate The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka. Use the SJP Annotation Guide (found below) to annotate this selection. The annotations are due at the beginning of the first class of the year. 

Seniors:
For seniors accepted into AP English IV, you must read and annotate Klara and the Sun, by Kazuo Ishiguro. Use the SJP Annotation Guide (found below) to annotate this selection. The annotations are due at the beginning of the first class of the year. 

Both seniors and juniors will need to purchase either a paperback or hardbound copy of your assigned book and annotate that book using the Annotation Guide below as a resource. This guide will serve as your instruction sheet for how to read your book actively and critically. Be sure to bring your annotated copy of the book with you to the first day of classes in September. Your English teacher will grade your annotations based on how well you follow this Annotation Guide in annotating your books. These annotations will serve as a great aid to you during class discussions of the novel in the first week of school. Most importantly, enjoy your reading!
SJP ANNOTATION GUIDE
 
            Annotating a literary text (or any text, for that matter) is a valuable skill for students to learn. Annotating can be defined as the process of taking notes directly on the literary text that you are reading. This is a skill that we in the SJP English Department want you to develop as you read your required novel this summer. In order for this to happen, you first need to know why annotating a text is useful and then how to annotate a text.
 
Why Annotating Is Useful
            Taking notes inside a text while reading is particularly useful because it forces your brain to transact with the text while reading. Really, your brain does this all the time anyway whenever you read, but annotating provides you with the opportunity to become cognitive of your brain’s work because you are writing down thoughts as they occur to you. Also, it allows you to keep track of significant plot events, characters, conflicts, literary techniques, and themes so that you can return to them more easily at a later time. In fact, studies show that after a six-week time lapse, students with an annotated text can recall all of the key information in that text after a 15- to 30-minute review session. Finally, as the old adage goes, writing it down is learning it twice. The physical act of transcribing your thoughts while reading cements the information into your memory; once this is done, you can access it later.
 
How to Annotate
            Annotating is a skill, and like most skills, it requires practice to develop. Because most of you are probably novices when it comes to taking notes inside the text, here are a few general guidelines to follow. Once you get comfortable with this skill, you may decide to craft your own parameters for annotation. The goal here is to give you a framework at the start. Only you know how you learn best, though, so feel free to adjust or add to this list as needed.
 
1.         Mark key lines: Any time you read a passage that is significant to the plot or character
development, underline it and write brief notes to yourself in the margin describing the
passage and/or why it is important.
 
2.         Ask questions: If a passage or scene is confusing, or if you want to know more about
what is occurring, bracket the passage or scene and jot your question in the margin. Then you can bring the question to class discussion for clarification.
 
3.         React to what you read: If something in the text strikes you, surprises you, troubles you,
or even makes you laugh, mark it and write your reaction in the margin. Often these
passages are intentionally written by the author to elicit such a response, so they can prove important later.
 
4.         Track themes: As you read, you will begin to discern the text’s threads or themes. Once
you notice them, you can begin marking them every time they occur. This is especially
valuable when it comes time to write an essay on the book.
 
5.         Notes at the end of each chapter: If the book is broken up into chapters, you should take a few minutes at the end of each one to list its 4-5 most important plot events. Do it right there in the book, right at the physical end of the chapter itself. That way, when you remember a key plot event but do not remember where in the text it occurs, or when you cannot recall which event occurs before which, you have a resource for easy reference instead of having to thumb through the entire book, mining it for one little piece of plot.
 
            At the beginning, you may find this process a bit laborious, but with some practice, it will become second nature to you. Ultimately, if you stick with it and concentrate on being an active note-taker while reading, you will find that you comprehend texts more fully and are better prepared to discuss and write about what you have read.
 
Otten, Nick. “How and Why to Annotate a Book.” http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/teachers_corner/197454.html. 6 May 2013.
 
Zimmerman, Enid. “Understanding How to Annotate.” http://www.arteducators.org/news/national-convention/Zimmerman_How_to_Annotate.pdf. 6 May 2013.
 
 
*Keep this Annotation Guide folded and in your novel for quick reference. You can also find this Annotation Guide online on the Prep website.

History Assignments

The History Department supports the idea of summer reading. Reading – whether for pleasure or for information – reinforces our Ignatian mission by promoting the ideals of a lifelong learner who is “open to growth” and “intellectually competent.” Summer reading also cultivates a community of learners by having a large and diverse group with disparate experiences and ideas share the same text. The History Department encourages students (and parents) to complement their reading with trips to local museums, battle sites, and places of historic value, as well as explorations of integrated websites and film portrayals.

REQUIRED READING
Freshmen
World History Only:  Stavridis, James. Sea Power. The History and Geopolitics of the World’s Oceans (Penguin Books, 2017). ISBN: 978-0735220614 

NOTE: The study guide is not mandatory--the book will be assessed in class through quizzes and other assessments.  Click Here.

AP Human Geography Only
:  Palmer, David.  AMSCO AP Human Geography 2nd edition.  (AMSCO, 2021).  ISBN: 978-1663609663 

NOTE:  Students should carefully read chapters 1 and 2, taking notes and preparing for an in class assessment. They should also look over the table of contents to see what the course covers and decide which unit interests them the most and why.

Sophomores
US History Only:  Cather, Willa. My Ántonia. (Dover Thrift Editions, 1994).  ISBN: 978-0-486-28240-4  NOTE:  Students must complete the attached study guide by the beginning of the school year. Click Here

AP US History Only:  Marsh, Dawn G.  A Lenape among the Quakers: The Life of Hannah Freeman (University of Nebraska Press, 2014).  ISBN: 978-0-8032-7520-1  NOTE:  Reading will be assessed at the beginning of the school year.

American Studies Only: Dunbar, Erica Armstrong.  She Came to Slay: The Life and Time of Harriet Tubman (Simon and Schuster (37 Ink), 2019).  ISBN: 978-1-9821-3959-9.  NOTE:  Please complete the study guide by the beginning of the school year. Click Here

Juniors
US Government and Politics/AP US Government and Politics:
Rothstein, Richard.  The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America.  (W.W. Norton & Co., 2017).  ISBN: 978-1-63149-453-6  NOTE:  The study guide is not mandatory--the book will be assessed in class through quizzes and other assessments.  Click Here.
 
Electives (Juniors and Seniors):
AP Psychology
Sacks, Oliver. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat: And Other Clinical Tales (Vintage Press, 2021).  ISBN: 978-0593466674 

NOTE:  Reading will be assessed at the beginning of the school year.

Honors Intro to Sociology: An article and a chapter from a book. See the attached.  NOTE: Reading will be assessed at the beginning of the school year. Click Here

Math Assignments

Review Packets for the following Math courses are posted on the right.
Students, if you are unsure of the Math course in which you are enrolled, please call the Main Office. 
 
The following classes do NOT have Review Packets:
  • MAT 408 - AP Statistics
  • MAT 412 - Finite Mathematics with Application
  • MAT 414 - Algebraic & Financial Applications
  • MAT 416 - Introduction to Statistics

Religious Studies Assignments

Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors will not have required reading for Religious Studies. 

Seniors: Senior teachers recommend that all students read When Bad Things Happen To Good People by Harold Kushner. You will need to purchase a paperback or hardbound copy. 

If you have any questions, please contact the Department Chair at ssanchirico@vocationtravel.com.

We hope you enjoy your summer and your summer reading!

Sincerely,
The Religious Studies Department

Science

No Assignments